Proposition 30 temporarily increases the state sales tax rate and the personal income tax rates for taxpayers with incomes above a certain level. The revenues generated would be used to fund schools and public safety programs. The state’s 2012-13 budget plan—approved by the Governor and the Legislature in June 2012—assumes passage of this measure.

For more information on this proposition, including voter resources, in-depth analysis, and endorsements, please see the California Choices web site....

Proposition 31 establishes a two-year state budget, and changes certain fiscal responsibilities of the Governor and the Legislature. State and local budgeting and oversight procedures would be changed. Local governments that create plans to coordinate services would receive funding from the state and could develop their own procedures for administering state programs.

california choices logoFor more information on this proposition, including voter resources, in-depth analysis, and endorsements, please see the California Choices web site....

Proposition 32 prohibits unions, corporations, and government contractors from using payroll-deducted funds for political purposes. It prohibits union and corporate contributions to candidates and their committees, and government contractor contributions to elected officers or their committees.

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Prop. 33 would change state law to allow insurance companies to set prices based on whether the driver previously carried auto insurance with any insurance company. Companies would be allowed to give discounts to drivers who had prior coverage. Drivers who have not had continuous coverage could be charged at higher rates under the measure.

For more information on this proposition, including voter resources, in-depth analysis, and endorsements, please see the California Choices web site....

Prop. 34 would repeal the death penalty and replace it with life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. Persons currently sentenced to death would have their sentences converted to life imprisonment. The measure would create a $100 million fund for law enforcement efforts to combat violent crime.

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This measure would increase prison sentences and fines for human trafficking. A person convicted of human trafficking would be required to register as a sex offender. Registered sex offenders would be required to disclose Internet activities and identities.

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Prop. 36 would alter California's "Three Strikes" law by imposing a life sentence only when the crime committed is a serious violent crime. Some offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who are currently serving life sentences for many nonserious, non-violent felony convictions could be resentenced to shorter prison terms. Life sentences would remain for felons with a non-violent third strike if the prior convictions were for murder, rape, or the sexual abuse of children. 

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Prop. 37 would require labeling of any raw or processed food that is made from plants or animals which have had their genetic material altered. The measure would prohibit marketing genetically engineered food as "natural". Certain foods are exempted.

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Prop. 38 would increase the state income tax rates for most Californians on a sliding scale, resulting in increased revenues of about $10 billion a year. Revenues would go to K-12 schools and early childhood programs, and to repay some state debt. The income tax increase would end after 12 years, unless voters reauthorize it.

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Prop. 39 would repeal an existing law that allows multistate businesses to choose a tax liability formula that provides favorable tax treatment for businesses with property and payroll outside California. It would require require multistate businesses to calculate their California income tax liability based on the percentage of their sales in California. Some of the increased revenues would be used to fund projects that create energy efficiency and clean energy jobs.

For more information on this proposition, including voter resources, in-depth analysis, and endorsements, please see the California Choices web site....

Prop. 40 is a referendum on the California State Senate redistricting plan approved by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission. A "Yes" vote approves, and a "No" vote rejects the new State Senate districts. If the proposition does not pass, the districts will be adjusted by officials supervised by the California Supreme Court.

For more information on this proposition, including voter resources, in-depth analysis, and endorsements, please see the California Choices web site....