Proposition 14 permits the state to sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California. Specifically, the measure would fund grants to support research and the development of treatments (including clinical trials) for specific diseases. In addition, the proposition directs the California Institute for Regenerative Medicineto (CIRM) to set aside up to 7.5 percent of bond funds for training opportunities for students at the California State University and the California community colleges, as well as providing assistance in establishing and supporting facilities focused on research and clinical trials.  The measure also makes numerous changes to CIRM including improving patient access, hiring additional staff, increasing the number of members on CIRM’s governing board, and creating an advisory group to facilitate the new rules.

Voter Information

Public Opinion

no polls available for this proposition at this time

Non-Partisan Resources

Endorsements

Pro

The proponents of Proposition 14 claim the measure will build on the success of Proposition 71, a 2004 measure which instituted statewide stem cell research and funding. They claim that Proposition 14 will continue to accelerate medical breakthroughs, expand clinical trials to more Californians, and provide revenues and jobs to contribute to California’s economic recovery. They also claim that the measure's provision concerning the creation of an oversight committee will ensure financial accountability.

Supporters

Con

Opponents claim that Proposition 14 will continue the conflict of interest and lack of legislative oversight of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, which was created by Proposition 71 in 2004. They claim the measure will set the stage for unregulated commercial stem cell clinics offering unapproved treatments. They say that the state cannot afford a multi-billion-dollar investment while facing an enormous budget deficit.